Media Js Netsol Trademark

The old adage goes that a week is a long time in politics. In spread betting, of course, a minute can be a long time with fortunes won or lost in a matter of moments. But the world of politics, both at home and abroad, can provide some of the most fascinating and potentially profitable markets in spread betting. As with all specialty markets, there is the potential for punters to turn the odds in their favour because they may know more than the market-makers.

 

Intrigue and gossip in the halls of Westminster may often be no more than that, but like all rumour, it often has some basis in truth. And even though the average spread bettor may not have an inside line on the ins and outs of the House of Commons, they may well be able to assess the statistics and comment every bit as well as the firms. In spread betting terms the main British market relates to the number of seats the parties are expected to pick up at the next General Election and this is often traded in running literally years before the event. Nearer the date of the General Election, quotes on the parties’ percentage of the overall vote, particular seats (such as the Prime Minister’s votes against the votes of the leader of the opposition) and various specials come on to the market.

 

In spread betting terms the main British market relates to the number of seats the parties are expected to pick up at the next General Election and this is often traded in running literally years before the event. Nearer the date of the General Election, quotes on the parties’ percentage of the overall vote, particular seats (such as the Prime Minister’s votes against the votes of the leader of the opposition) and various specials come on to the market.